Difference Between Temporary And Permanent Hardness Of Water

Water hardness is a measure of the mineral content of water, and can be classified as temporary or permanent. In this blog, we will discuss the differences between temporary and permanent water hardness, and how to identify and treat each type.

Definition of temporary hardness and permanent hardness

Definition of temporary hardness and permanent hardness

Water hardness is a term used to describe the amount of dissolved minerals in water. Hard water contains minerals such as magnesium and calcium, while soft water contains very few minerals.

The main difference between the two is how they are affected by boiling. Temporary hardness is caused by the presence of bicarbonates such as calcium bicarbonate and magnesium bicarbonate.

When water containing these compounds is boiled, the bicarbonates break down and form carbonates which can be easily removed. Permanent hardness is caused by the presence of chlorides and sulfates of calcium and magnesium.

Boiling has no effect on these compounds, so permanent hardness remains even after boiling.

Causes of temporary and permanent hardness

Causes of temporary and permanent hardness

When it comes to the hardness of water, there are two types – temporary and permanent. The main difference between the two is the degree of mineral content present in the water.

Temporary hardness is caused by the presence of calcium bicarbonate and magnesium bicarbonate, which can be removed by boiling the water. Permanent hardness, on the other hand, is caused by the presence of calcium and magnesium ions, which cannot be removed by boiling. As a result, water with permanent hardness is considered ‘harder’ than water with temporary hardness.

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In order to reduce the hardness of water with permanent hardness, an ion exchange process is needed to replace the calcium and magnesium ions with sodium ions.

Effects of temporary and permanent hardness

Effects of temporary and permanent hardness

Water is a vital resource for both human and environmental health, and its quality is defined by a number of factors. Two of these are temporary and permanent hardness of water. Although these terms may sound similar, there is a significant difference between them.

Although these terms may sound similar, there is a significant difference between them. Temporary hardness is caused by the presence of calcium bicarbonate and magnesium bicarbonate in water. These compounds are completely soluble and can be removed through boiling.

Permanent hardness, on the other hand, is caused by calcium and magnesium sulfates, which are insoluble and cannot be removed by boiling. The effects of these two types of hardness on water can be hugely varied, ranging from aesthetic to health concerns.

Excessive levels of both can lead to health risks, causing issues such as increased risk of kidney stones. It is therefore important to be aware of the differences between temporary and permanent hardness and take steps to reduce the levels of each.

Treatment of temporary and permanent hardness

Treatment of temporary and permanent hardness

Water hardness is a measure of the amount of dissolved calcium and magnesium in your water supply. The two types of water hardness are temporary and permanent. The difference between temporary and permanent hardness is that temporary hardness can be removed from water through boiling, while permanent hardness is caused by the presence of certain salts that cannot be removed through boiling.

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The difference between temporary and permanent hardness is that temporary hardness can be removed from water through boiling, while permanent hardness is caused by the presence of certain salts that cannot be removed through boiling. Temporary hardness is caused by the presence of bicarbonates, while permanent hardness is caused by chlorides and sulfates. Temporary hardness can be reduced by boiling, while permanent hardness requires the use of special chemical treatments, such as ion exchange or reverse osmosis.

While both types of hardness can be a nuisance, permanent hardness is usually more problematic as it requires more work to remove.

Advantages and disadvantages of soft and hard water

Advantages and disadvantages of soft and hard water

The difference between soft and hard water lies in the amount of minerals present in it. Soft water has fewer minerals, while hard water has more.

This determines the hardness of the water and can have both advantages and disadvantages. When it comes to temporary and permanent hardness, the difference lies in the type of minerals present. Temporary hardness is due to the presence of calcium bicarbonate, while permanent hardness is due to the presence of chlorides and sulfates.

Soft water has its advantages, such as making lathering of soaps easier and having less scaling in pipes. However, it can be corrosive and also lacks important minerals like calcium and magnesium.

On the other hand, hard water has its own set of benefits. It contains minerals like calcium and magnesium, which are important for our health. It also doesn’t corrode pipes and helps reduce soap scum.

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However, it can be difficult to lather, can clog pipes, and can leave unsightly marks on dishes. Overall, the difference between temporary and permanent hardness of water is an important one to consider when determining the type of water to use. Soft water can be beneficial, but it is important to consider the lack of minerals it contains. Hard water can provide important minerals, but can lead to clogged pipes and scaling.


Conclusion

In conclusion, the main difference between temporary and permanent hardness of water is in the type of minerals that cause it. Temporary hardness is caused by bicarbonates of calcium and magnesium, while permanent hardness is caused by chlorides and sulfates of calcium and magnesium.

Both types of hardness can be a problem for domestic use and industrial use, as they can cause scaling, blockages, and staining.

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